Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: What blend % of WMO

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    154

    What blend % of WMO

    What % WMO to diesel are you running?

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    6
    In my 1979 240D automatic I can do 50% without much of a problem. The remainder being diesel. This is with about 10 feet of hose in hose heating just before the fuel pump. I have tried the 85 WMO and 15 gasoline but it creates carbon deposits so heavy my top speed drops from 70 to 55 within one tank. Also with that much gas it starts to boil if I have the hih heater connected. This oil is mostly diesel motor oil from someone's semi that they change the oil in. I imagine I could do a bit better with thinner oil.

    I clean by letting the oil settle in a 275 gallon tote for a week or more then letting the bottom run off into a barrel. Then I run the rest through a wvo centrifuge as slow as I can get it to go, just a few gallons an hour. There is an inline heater made of a water heater element before the oil reaches the centrifuge.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    15
    Gasoline reduces cetane. They work just opposite of each other.

    It seems gasoline is needed help to break the heavy particles out of the oil. I'm trying to use only 5% RUG, then I plan to thin the rest out with either D1 or kerosene.

    I would like to 'fuge 100% oil...no RUG at all then thin it down. Well, that's my plan. My 'fuge will be ordered very soon,

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    6
    My understanding from research I've done online is that ceta e is for starting the engine. And once started it has no affect.

    I don't do any mixing before filtering. My clean oil tank has just oil. The. I pump it into my vehicle and add gasoline or diesel to suit.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    15
    Cetane is to a diesel engine, as octane is to a gasoline engine.

    Cetane number or CN is a measure of a fuel's ignition delay; the time period between the start of injection and the first identifiable pressure increase during combustion of the fuel. In a particular diesel engine, higher cetane fuels will have shorter ignition delay periods than lower cetane fuels. Cetane numbers are only used for the relatively light distillate diesel oils. For heavy (residual) fuel oil two other scales are used CCAI and CII. In short, the higher the Cetane number the more easily the fuel will combust in a compression setting (such as a diesel engine).

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    154
    From Marcus Via Facebook:
    I think I found the solution to the smoke problem with the WMO, I'm now blending with E85 and it works like a charm! No smoke, about 12% works for my truck. FYI.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •